Evaluation Report

I feel i have learnt a variety of different concepts and facts throughout my Textile Innovation unit. I have always been interested in originality within design and always researching the new developments within the textile industry. The evolution of textiles is rising and showing its true potential. I wanted to investigate this further and broaden my knowledge within innovative textiles which is the main reason why i chose this unit subject.

I learnt the different fibre types and their individual properties, the different types of knitting, and the technological advancements that are additions to fibres and textiles. However, what stood out to me the most was how textiles can evolve human function further. Textiles can take humans to the next step whether it’d be a NASA protective spacesuit or an alginate based bandage. This research soon developed me onto bio-fibres, bacteria based materials such as human bacteria (and its ability to grow onto textiles) and Kombucha Bacteria Textiles. Showing how they can help us develop antibiotics as-well as being a no waste textile that naturally decomposes therefore making it a eco friendly textile. During my Textile innovation unit I learnt the important of eco friendly textiles and how the industry turns out so much wasteful textiles that harm our environment. 

I feel i have explored my personal research well relating back to what i learnt within my lectures and to the designers and textiles that i had learnt about. I have used a variety of references from magazines to articles, journals, books, websites, videos and images. This allowed me to to openly explore my chosen subject matter and see the experiments and research that scientists, doctors and designers have done and relate it back to my own research findings, analysis and experiments. I also linked my own textile practice to my blog relating my own work to the lectures that i had and showing examples of some of the practices and fibres that were talked about. I also created my own experiment with human bacteria using Sonja Baumel as my inspiration, from this i learnt that natural fibres were a more successful ‘vessel’ to grow human bacteria than synthetic man-made fibres.

At first I personally found it difficult to find relevant research about bacteria textiles as it is a textile that is being developed. Suzanne Lee has gained attention for her bacteria textile recipe and has created textile fashionable pieces from this material. I also found it hard to experiment with it myself as I felt i didn’t give myself enough time or have the proper equipment (sensor and regulated heat) to fully develop this process and perhaps try suzanne Lee’s recipe myself. I would of loved to start dying the bacteria based textile using vegetable dye and worked with the translucency and colour of the textile itself.

Perhaps I could of experimented with the functionality of bacteria based textiles, perhaps i could of experimented and researched into how i could make it fire-resistant and waterproof to make it less fragile and more sustainable to environmental variables. This would give me more of a personal understanding with the material and perhaps develop the bacteria based textile innovation further.

Overall I feel I have worked hard and explored my personal research well. Using reflective questioning and analysis to take me further in my research as well as gaining knowledge into the innovative possibilities of bacteria based textiles. I have used the idea of bacteria within my own textile practice. I have begun to create my own research and use the appearance of bacteria to develop my work through, colour texture and shape. I feel that Textile Innovation has opened my eyes to the possibilities within textiles. It has also taught me to ‘think outside the box’ and to experiment more with my textiles to create something new and innovative.

Some of my own experiments developing and manipulating human bacteria by mixing it with alginate ‘jelly’, acid and vegetable dyes:

1 2 3 4 5

 

 

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Human Microbiome on Textiles Experiment

The aim of this experiment is to see which fibre grows the most human bacteria within 3 weeks.

This is to see which fibre is the most successful in growing human microbiome. I plan to grow the bacteria from my skin cells onto the textile.

This experiment shows similar connections to Sonja Bäumels’. However she used a combination of her bacteria and artificial bacteria. I plan just to use my own bacteria from my skin.

01Baumel, S, (2009), Bacteria Textile [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.sonjabaeumel.at/works[Accessed 01 January 15].

0708

Bäumel, S, (2011), cartography of the human body [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.sonjabaeumel.at/work/bacteria/cartography-of-the-human-body [Accessed 01 January 15].

Within this experiment i will be using these variables:

Independent Variable – The variable changed or manipulated. 

Dependent Variable (the variable that is measured)  – The variable you measure

Control Variable (constant variable) – The variable you keep the same

 

Independent variable: The two types of fibres i will be experimenting on.

Cotton – Natural Fibre

Polyester and Nylon Mix – Synthetic Man-Made Fibre

Dependant Variable- The amount of Human microbiome that grows in 3 weeks. The textile with the most visible Human microbiome therefore will be the most successful.

bacteria-in-a-petri-dish– Should look a little like this. 

Unknown, (2014), Lactocillin [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282636.php [Accessed 01 January 15].

Control Variable (Constant variable) – keeping the textiles at room temperature within a slight damp aired room. I will also use a off-white coloured textile materials to clearly show the darker colour of the human bacteria and still be able to see the lighter coloured bacteria. 

Week 1

Cotton Textile: I saw a quick change in the slight Cotton textile and saw a discolouration within the fabric.

Synthetic Textile:  No change within the

Week 2:

Cotton Textile: Majority grey Human microbiome forming and some black. Slight offensive smell.

Synthetic: Slight Discolouration

experiment 2

Synthetic: Slight Discolouration

 experiment

Week 3:

Cotton Textile: Alot of black Human microbiome has grown and a very distinct offensive smell.

main4

DSC_2193

 

Synethetic: Some very small Human microbiome has grown.

main2 main3

Conclusion: From my small experiment i can clearly see that cotton was the most successful in being the structure to hold and grow human microbiome.

However the fact that i only used one type of natural fibre does this really mean that natural fibres are the most successful in growing bacteria?

I researched this a little further to further conclude and prove that my first conclusion is correct:

‘Unnatural man-made fibres, like fibres of glass,plastic or polyester, are only slightly affected, even after long exposure.’

BORYO, D.E.A. , 2013. The Effect of Microbes on Textile Material: A Review on the Way-Out So Far. The International Journal Of Engineering And Science , [Online]. 2 (8), pp. 9-13. Available at:http://www.theijes.com/papers/v2-i8/Part.1/B028109013.pdf [Accessed 01 January 2015].

“Textiles made from natural fibres are generally more susceptible to  bacteria, they can quickly grow under favourable conditions of temperature and humidity”

Unknown. 2009. Talking rot… and mildew. [ONLINE] Available at: http://fungus.org.uk/nwfg/rot.htm. [Accessed 01 January 15].

Bibliography

Online Image

Baumel, S, (2009), Bacteria Textile [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.sonjabaeumel.at/works[Accessed 01 January 15].

Bäumel, S, (2011), cartography of the human body [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.sonjabaeumel.at/work/bacteria/cartography-of-the-human-body [Accessed 01 January 15].

Unknown, (2014), Lactocillin [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282636.php [Accessed 01 January 15].

Online Journal

BORYO, D.E.A. , 2013. The Effect of Microbes on Textile Material: A Review on the Way-Out So Far. The International Journal Of Engineering And Science , [Online]. 2 (8), pp. 9-13. Available at:http://www.theijes.com/papers/v2-i8/Part.1/B028109013.pdf [Accessed 01 January 2015].

Website

Unknown. 2009. Talking rot… and mildew. [ONLINE] Available at: http://fungus.org.uk/nwfg/rot.htm. [Accessed 01 January 15].

 

 

 

 

Human bacteria based textile – Bio-Material.

Human bacteria based textile – Bio-Material.

From my notes of my lectures i found that i have learnt a little about biomaterials :-

Growing Fabrics

  • Alternative to petrochemicals or plants as a raw material for textile products.
  • Biocouture explores growing microbes to create textile/leather type bio material.
  • The fermentation of bacteria forms a dense layer, flexible cellulose mat that can then be harvested.
  • Takes dye easily and can be printed.
  • Safe to compost- feels like vegetable leather.

Biomaterial – Human microorganism textile

Where does it come from?

Who is it made by?

What fibre type is it?

How is it Manufactured?

What it cant do and why?

What is it properties?

The human bacteria is a byproduct made by humans. The fibre type is a natural bio-fibre. Human microbiome (bacteria), the trillions of microbes that live in and on the human body.

“We now understand that humans are 90% microbial but only 10% human. The average human has over 100 trillion microbes in and on their body, and many of the latest discoveries are challenging previously held ideas about good and bad bacteria. We are witnessing the shift from a World ruled by the antibacterial obsessed and non-stop antibacterial marketing, to one that has a heightened awareness of the importance of the microbial ecosystem (the microbiome).” 

National Research Council, 2008. Achievements of the National Plant Genome Initiative and New Horizons in Plant Biology . 1st ed. New York: National Academies Press.

Human Microbiome gives off chemicals that allow us to harness them and turn them into antibiotics. 

Human bacteria can be placed onto textiles proven by sonja bäumel:- 

0102

Baumel, S, (2009), Bacteria Textile [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.sonjabaeumel.at/works[Accessed 01 January 15].

The natural layer of bacteria on the protagonist’s skin was removed and then placed onto the textiles. These Texile pieces were then kept in room temperature with a slight damp atmosphere (these are great conditions for the growth of bacteria). 

It has been said that our bacteria can be the answer to some of our medical problems. Human microbiome can be made into medicines and be used to help/heal some health problems. 

“Our bacteria are involved in a wide range of metabolic and developmental processes, from food digestion to vitamin synthesis. Recently, scientists have even suggested the gut microbiome may offer clues about autism.” 

Paddock, C PHD. 2014. Antibiotics found in human body bacteria. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282636.php. [Accessed 14 January 15].

“Now in this latest study, the researchers suggest the human microbiome may be a rich source of naturally occurring drugs for protecting health. In a way, it should not be surprising that our microbiomes make drugs. Prof. Fischbach, who specializes in discovering interesting molecules made by microbes, says around a third of all the drugs we use come from microbes and plants. These include antibiotics like penicillin, many chemotherapy drugs, and drugs for lowering cholesterol.”

Paddock, C PHD. 2014. Antibiotics found in human body bacteria. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282636.php. [Accessed 14 January 15].

“In their study, he and his colleagues purified and solved the structure of lactocillin, an antibiotic compound that is produced by a common bacterial species, Lactobacillus gasseri, found in microbial colonies in the vagina. It is closely related to antibiotics that pharmaceutical companies are already testing. It kills several bacteria that infect the vagina, while leaving harmless microbes intact.”

Paddock, C PHD. 2014. Antibiotics found in human body bacteria. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282636.php. [Accessed 14 January 15].

bacteria-in-a-petri-dish

 

Unknown, (2014), Lactocillin [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282636.php [Accessed 01 January 15].

However when placing this bacteria onto natural fibre textiles the bacteria eventually decomposes of the fibres just leaving the bacteria. 

This is shown within reports of textile manufacturing where micro-organisms can be utilized by man, their activities in relation to textiles are harmful.

The ‘ Natural fibres, being of organic nature, are perishable and their decomposition is a natural phenomenon’

BORYO, D.E.A. , 2013. The Effect of Microbes on Textile Material: A Review on the Way-Out So Far. The International Journal Of Engineering And Science , [Online]. 2 (8), pp. 9-13. Available at:http://www.theijes.com/papers/v2-i8/Part.1/B028109013.pdf [Accessed 01 January 2015].

As shown within my own experiment natural fibres were the most successful in thew growth of human bacteria.

‘Unnatural man-made fibres, like fibres of glass,plastic or polyester, are only slightly affected, even after long exposure.’ 

BORYO, D.E.A. , 2013. The Effect of Microbes on Textile Material: A Review on the Way-Out So Far. The International Journal Of Engineering And Science , [Online]. 2 (8), pp. 9-13. Available at:http://www.theijes.com/papers/v2-i8/Part.1/B028109013.pdf [Accessed 01 January 2015].

Meaning that the sustainability of these fibres is a positive as the bacteria will eventually decompose the fibres organically which is better for the environment and creates no waste. However this also create time constraints as if this material wanted to be used for anything such as medicines and perhaps clothes it would have to be used before it started to completely decompose.

If you wanted to speed up the process Dissanayake suggests ‘ Under the optimal conditions of being buried in the top few inches of a tropical soil or the soil of a cucumber house, all unprotected natural fibres will disintegrate.’

DISSANAYAKE, N P J, 2011. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF FLAX FIBRES. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF FLAX FIBRES FOR THE REINFORCEMENT OF POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES, [Online]. 1, 14-29. Available at:http://www.academia.edu/735685/LIFE_CYCLE_ASSESSMENT_OF_FLAX_FIBRES_FOR_THE_REINFORCEMENT_OF_POLYMER_MATRIX_COMPOSITES[Accessed 01 January 2015].

  • ‘As with all microbial activity the factors which influence the development of micro-organisms on textiles are independent. Essentially they are; temperature,moisture, the chemical and physical nature of the materials and, of course, the micro-organism themselves’
  • ‘ Damage to the textile itself by microorganisms can occur at nearly all stages of manufacture. It may range from simple surface growth of mould fungi leading to musty smell and discoloration, a condition known to the trade as ‘mildew’, to the actual decay, or ‘tendering’ by moulds of bacteria, causing loss of tensile strength.’

‘Stains due to coloured spores, or to intracellular or soluble pigments, make the goods unsightly and lead to unevenness in subsequent dyeing’

BORYO, D.E.A. , 2013. The Effect of Microbes on Textile Material: A Review on the Way-Out So Far. The International Journal Of Engineering And Science , [Online]. 2 (8), pp. 9-13. Available at:http://www.theijes.com/papers/v2-i8/Part.1/B028109013.pdf [Accessed 01 January 2015].

 

Due to the nature of this bio-fibre it is’nt fireproof, waterproof and overall quite fragile especially (if combined with a natural fibered textile) when the bacteria has eventually decomposed of the structure of the textile. These are just some of the reasons behind why i don’t think this is a textile that is for fashion based properties/purposes.

Also i feel that the bacteria formed could be unstable and if grown in the wrong environment or just DNA within the bacteria ( from skin ect) that has hereditary records of illnesses or if the person is currently ill wouldn’t  this effect the bacteria differently and might cause further problems rather than healing them?

Also from my own experiments the smell is grotesque and not something i’d like to be near for long, never mind wear.

However further research has brought me to this, which could be answer to this problem:-

Banana Bacteria by Dr. Howard Boland involves genetically replacing the foul odor of E. coli bacteria with the sweet smell of bananas. Originally engineered by scientists at MIT, the genetic design enables the bacteria to synthetically produce banana oil. The development offers new possibilities for the flavoring industry, and also raises the prospect of modified bacteria within humans. For example, bad breath could be cured by an internal, synthetically derived fresh mint smell.”

WGSN, 2013. Design Beyond Making. Grow Your Own…Banana Bacteria, [Online]. 1, 3. Available at:http://www.wgsn.com.arts.idm.oclc.org/content/board_viewer/#/40366/page/3 [Accessed 01 January 2015].

Bibliography

Online Image

Baumel, S, (2009), Bacteria Textile [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.sonjabaeumel.at/works[Accessed 01 January 15].

Unknown, (2014), Lactocillin [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282636.php [Accessed 01 January 15].

Book

National Research Council, 2008. Achievements of the National Plant Genome Initiative and New Horizons in Plant Biology . 1st ed. New York: National Academies Press.

Website

Paddock, C PHD. 2014. Antibiotics found in human body bacteria. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282636.php. [Accessed 14 January 15].

Online Article

BORYO, D.E.A. , 2013. The Effect of Microbes on Textile Material: A Review on the Way-Out So Far. The International Journal Of Engineering And Science , [Online]. 2 (8), pp. 9-13. Available at:http://www.theijes.com/papers/v2-i8/Part.1/B028109013.pdf [Accessed 01 January 2015].

WGSN, 2013. Design Beyond Making. Grow Your Own…Banana Bacteria, [Online]. 1, 3. Available at:http://www.wgsn.com.arts.idm.oclc.org/content/board_viewer/#/40366/page/3 [Accessed 01 January 2015].

DISSANAYAKE, N P J, 2011. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF FLAX FIBRES. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF FLAX FIBRES FOR THE REINFORCEMENT OF POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES, [Online]. 1, 14-29. Available at:http://www.academia.edu/735685/LIFE_CYCLE_ASSESSMENT_OF_FLAX_FIBRES_FOR_THE_REINFORCEMENT_OF_POLYMER_MATRIX_COMPOSITES[Accessed 01 January 2015].

Kombucha Bacteria Textile

Construction,  sustainability and functionality

I decided to look into the construction and functionality of bacteria based materials. In relation to my human bacteria research i decided to look further into bacteria based textiles and research there properties, functionalities, construction and sustainability further.

 

 Suzanne Lee

BioBomber_jacket1

 

Lee, S, (2012), BioCouture [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.isciencemag.co.uk/features/suzanne-lee/[Accessed 04 January 15].

Jobbins Wells uses the same Technique as Suzanne Lee

Skin-by-Sammy-Jobbins-Wells_dezeen_468_3

Wells, S J, (2014), Bacteria produces Textiles for skin body Adornments [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.dezeen.com/2014/08/12/skin-sammy-jobbins-wells-wearable-objects-bacteria-cellulose/[Accessed 04 January 15].

 

How is it made

“The fibres the material itself and the formation itself is done by a microbe rather than a plant”

Biocouture . (2012). Microbes are “the factories of the future”. [Online Video]. 13 May. Available from:http://vimeo.com/86436024. [Accessed: 01 January 2015].

‘As with all microbial activity the factors which influence the development of micro-organisms on textiles are independent. Essentially they are; temperature,moisture, the chemical and physical nature of the materials and, of course, the micro-organism themselves’ 

BORYO, D.E.A. , 2013. The Effect of Microbes on Textile Material: A Review on the Way-Out So Far. The International Journal Of Engineering And Science , [Online]. 2 (8), pp. 9-13. Available at:http://www.theijes.com/papers/v2-i8/Part.1/B028109013.pdf [Accessed 01 January 2015].

This means that the bacteria in order to grow needs to have certain conditions to do so. Each bacteria is different and therefore has different conditions and variables to grow.

Jobbin Wells and Suzanne Lee

Biocouture Company (founded by Suzanne Lee) have created a ‘recipe’ to grow your own Kombucha which is a symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeasts (SCOBY).

“The main bacteria, Gluconacetobacter xylinum, produces nanofibrils of cellulose which self-organise in to a nano-structured, textile-like material.”

Bio Couture. 2009. Grow you own material recipe. [ONLINE] Available at: http://biocouture.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Biocouture-Grow-your-own-material-recipe-creative-common-license.pdf. [Accessed 01 January 15].

To create the material, the bacteria requires specific conditions. A solution of glucose and green tea is mixed with water and kept at room temperature for optimum growth.

The tea provides added nutrients for the bacteria and also gives colour to the end material (tea stained colour)

“I discovered that regular, white Japanese Sencha tea allowed for the greatest transparency seen in the structure,” said Jobbins Wells.

Howarth, D, De Zeen Magazine, 2012. Bacteria produces textiles. Bacteria produces textiles for Skin body adornments by Jobbins Wells, [Online]. 1, 1. Available at:http://www.dezeen.com/2014/08/12/skin-sammy-jobbins-wells-wearable-objects-bacteria-cellulose/[Accessed 01 January 2015].

Jobbin Wells started with a small jar, the designer harvested and transferred larger and larger cultures over a few months until she had sheets of material grown in a reptile terrarium enough to create the wearable objects.

A Video produced by Dougal Shaw shows Suzanne Lee developing her own textiles using Using a recipe of green tea, sugar, bacteria and yeast she is able to ‘grow’ a material which she describes as a kind of “vegetable leather”. She desscribes the satges of her bacteria textiles. 

BBC News Technology. (2012). Biocouture: Designer Suzanne Lee on growing your own clothes. [Online Video]. 07 June. Available from: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-18301669. [Accessed: 01 January 2015].

Suzanne creates the solution and leaves it for a couple of weeks. The living organism that grows ontop of the substance this is the material. The living organism material which she calls a “sheet” grows ontop of the substance and within a few weeks it is thick enough to mould and manipulate into shapes and to make into clothing.

Whilst the material is growing Suzeanne Lee has a sensor which is controlled by a thermostat which regulates the temperature.

BBC News Technology. (2012). Biocouture: Designer Suzanne Lee on growing your own clothes. [Online Video]. 07 June. Available from: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-18301669. [Accessed: 01 January 2015].

sustainability

The ‘ Natural fibres, being of organic nature, are perishable and their decomposition is a natural phenomenon’ meaning that the sustainability of these fibres is a positive for the environment as the bacteria will eventually decompose the fibres organically which is better as it creates no waste. However this also create time constraints as if this material wanted to be used for anything such as medicines and perhaps clothes it would have to be used before it started to completely decompose.

Burgess, R, 2008. Applied MicroBiology. Applied MicroBiology: Symposium on Microbial Spoilage on Industrial Materials, 17 (2), pp. 1.

Construction

In my second lecture i learnt about bio-materials and an artists named Tomas Libertiny who used a ‘skeleton’ of a vase and he used bees to construct the rest of the vase to create the result of a vase made of  honeycombs. The microorganisms used to create the textiles that i am researching are also bio-materials and perhaps can create a construction using a similar method to Tomas libertiny.

hv_2AP

Libertíny, T, (2007), The Honeycomb Vase [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.dezeen.com/2007/04/19/studio-libertiny-at-droog/ [Accessed 01 January 15].

This shows a similar construction technique to Suzeanne Lee who describes how the cellulose material is able to fuse to itself as it dries, so holds in place if wrapped round an object. This allows you to mold the material around a structure and allow it to dry in place. This is also sustainable and creates no waste as there is no stitching or any wasted material created. 

‘Natural fibres, being of organic nature, are perishable and their decomposition is a natural phenomenon’ and ‘all unprotected natural fibres will disintegrate.’ So the textile itself will be gone however the form of micro-organisms will carry on growing as it has already been created thanks to the beginning form of the textile.

Jobbins Wells used the Delaunay triangulation algorithm to create the shapes out of her bacteria based materials she also laser-cut the balsa wood frames, ‘using the Grasshopper plug-in for 3D modelling software Rhino.’

 

Bio- response Textiles

  • A pine cone inspired a fabric that becomes more open or closed in response to changes in humidity

17-mmt-icon

unknown, (2009), unknown [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.innovationintextiles.com/pine-cone-effect-to-be-used-in-moisture-management-fabrics/ [Accessed 31 October 14].

 

Similar to this bacteria based textile you could arguably be seen as a bio-response textile. Bacteria changes in different temperatures and conditions:-

Humid conditions the bacteria grows

In freezing temperatures the bacteria goes to sleep and therefore will not grow until it’s warmer

When it is hot on average bacteria dies at temperatures 60C-75C

Function

Jobbin Well’s and Suzanne Lees’s bacteria (made of glucose and tea):-

 

Positives

Jobbin Well’s, Suzanne Lees’s- result is a flexible organic material that contracts and hardens around a physical form as it dries, mimicking skin stretched over bone.

Jobbin Well’s, Suzanne Lees’s- “When wet, the cellulose is incredibly flexible and tensile and it is incredibly difficult to pull material with a thickness of more than two millimetres apart,” said Jobbins Wells.

Jobbin Well’s, Suzanne Lees’s – When dry, the material maintains a large degree of its strength but has a strange, leathery feel, almost like old human skin.” – Fairly strong material like a thin leather.

Howarth, D, De Zeen Magazine, 2012. Bacteria produces textiles. Bacteria produces textiles for Skin body adornments by Jobbins Wells, [Online]. 1, 1. Available at:http://www.dezeen.com/2014/08/12/skin-sammy-jobbins-wells-wearable-objects-bacteria-cellulose/[Accessed 01 January 2015].

Jobbin Well’s, Suzanne Lees’s – You can dye the material as proven by Suzanne Lee’s work. 

BioDenim_jacket

Lee, S, (2012), SUZANNE LEE AND HER CELLULOID CLOTHING [ONLINE]. Available at:http://trendland.com/suzanne-lee-and-her-celluloid-clothing/ [Accessed 01 January 15].

However because it is a cellulose based material it can only be dyed with natural dyes (which i have explained further within my own textile work within my lecture two category). I think that vegetable and fruit dyes would stain/dye this material easily.   

Negatives

Although it offers opportunities for textile production, the material is not without its flaws: “Unfortunately, the material in its current form is not waterproof and does eventually return to a wet state upon sustained contact with moisture,” says Jobbin Wells

Even though these bacteria based material arn’t waterproof, fireproof , stainproof. It is a material that is being developed and could be developed further to have these functions. Perhaps laminating it with a natural fibre untop could make it waterproof? However it would need to be a bio-degrdable fibre to keep the materials main function.

However the main function of this material is that its bio-degradable and therefore will not negatively effect the environment. There is no waste from these materials which is a growing problem within the idustry and adding to environmental pollution.

 

Conclusion

“The wearable object serves to stimulate a conversation, debate and even critique over the future implication of bio-materials in the manufacture of physical objects,” She uses cellulose bacteria and she does make a good point that bacteria based materials if developed further could be showing some implication into the future of bio-materials as the functions and properties that they hold the potential to be useful as well as there ability to organically decompose and therefore no waste or pollution to the environment.

 

Website

Online Images

Lee, S, (2012), BioCouture [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.isciencemag.co.uk/features/suzanne-lee/[Accessed 04 January 15].

Libertíny, T, (2007), The Honeycomb Vase [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.dezeen.com/2007/04/19/studio-libertiny-at-droog/ [Accessed 01 January 15].

Lee, S, (2012), SUZANNE LEE AND HER CELLULOID CLOTHING [ONLINE]. Available at:http://trendland.com/suzanne-lee-and-her-celluloid-clothing/ [Accessed 01 January 15].

unknown, (2009), unknown [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.innovationintextiles.com/pine-cone-effect-to-be-used-in-moisture-management-fabrics/ [Accessed 31 October 14].

Wells, S J, (2014), Bacteria produces Textiles for skin body Adornments [ONLINE]. Available at:http://www.dezeen.com/2014/08/12/skin-sammy-jobbins-wells-wearable-objects-bacteria-cellulose/[Accessed 04 January 15].

Website

Bio Couture. 2009. Grow you own material recipe. [ONLINE] Available at: http://biocouture.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Biocouture-Grow-your-own-material-recipe-creative-common-license.pdf. [Accessed 01 January 15].

Video

BBC News Technology. (2012). Biocouture: Designer Suzanne Lee on growing your own clothes. [Online Video]. 07 June. Available from: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-18301669. [Accessed: 01 January 2015].

Biocouture . (2012). Microbes are “the factories of the future”. [Online Video]. 13 May. Available from:http://vimeo.com/86436024. [Accessed: 01 January 2015].

Journal

Burgess, R, 2008. Applied MicroBiology. Applied MicroBiology: Symposium on Microbial Spoilage on Industrial Materials, 17 (2), pp. 1.

Online Journal

BORYO, D.E.A. , 2013. The Effect of Microbes on Textile Material: A Review on the Way-Out So Far. The International Journal Of Engineering And Science , [Online]. 2 (8), pp. 9-13. Available at:http://www.theijes.com/papers/v2-i8/Part.1/B028109013.pdf [Accessed 01 January 2015].

Howarth, D, De Zeen Magazine, 2012. Bacteria produces textiles. Bacteria produces textiles for Skin body adornments by Jobbins Wells, [Online]. 1, 1. Available at:http://www.dezeen.com/2014/08/12/skin-sammy-jobbins-wells-wearable-objects-bacteria-cellulose/[Accessed 01 January 2015].

Human Microorganism Textiles Questions and Developmental Ideas.

During my research into Textile Body Suits I discovered the artist Sonja Baumel whose work is about the ‘life on the human body and its design applications,’ she is  ‘exploring the human skin and its potential.’  Her ‘on-going research and creative process. This work is part of the (In)visible membrane project which consists of following projects: crocheted membrane, oversized petri dish, bacteria texture, visible membrane I and bacteria textile’ 

Sonja Baumel. 2009. Visible Membrane . [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.sonjabaeumel.at/work/bacteria/visible-membrane-i. [Accessed 01 January 15].

 

‘What fascinates me is the human skin, the layer between the inside and the outside. a second skin can be found on our skin. It is a layer full of life, which serves as a membrane for exchange. This body membrane is made from the same substance as the world. The human body does not end with its skin, but it is invisibly expanding into space. The hidden membrane is something between our body and our environment. We enter this invisible micro level with a microscope and then enlarge it with design.’

Sonja Baumel. 2009. Visible Membrane . [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.sonjabaeumel.at/work/bacteria/visible-membrane-i. [Accessed 01 January 15].

‘What happens if we make the micro world of the human body perceivable? I want to confront people with the fact that our body is a large host of bacteria and that a balanced perception of the body is closely linked with a balanced perception of the self.’

Sonja Baumel. 2009. Visible Membrane . [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.sonjabaeumel.at/work/bacteria/visible-membrane-i. [Accessed 01 January 15].

 

I personally found her work fascinating and wondered about its possibilities further. Could it be a new textile in itself. Can the human body be used to create different textiles from just the mico-organisms of our skin?

Could this new form of textile then have the possibilities to turn into something else? Could it have a function?

I know that bacteria is used to make medicines so perhaps this human micro-organism textile could be developed into a medical textile with the right knowledge and study?

Also what are the other properties of this new textile? Perhaps it could be used for something else? What else can human bacteria/micro-organism be used for?

By making the micro-organisms more visible by letting them grow onto textiles it would be easier to control and handle…. therefore what could the possibilities be? what are the potentials that this could be turned into?

I would like to experiment with this myself and begin growing my own human micro-organisms onto textiles.

I will also relate this back to my lectures. Finding out what fibre types work best when growing the micro-organisms and why some work better than others. What is its functionality? Can it be constructed further? what is it’s sustainability?

Bibliography

Sonja Baumel. 2009. Visible Membrane . [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.sonjabaeumel.at/work/bacteria/visible-membrane-i. [Accessed 01 January 15].

Construction of Knit. My own Textile Design Work.

I decided to do a little experiment with the traditional construction of textile knitting. Within the last lecture i briefly learnt about oversize knitting. However i began to think how knitting is usually constructed into one shape or form. I began to wonder whether i can use different shapes that i create through knitting and then knit them together like a knitted jigsaw puzzle therefore creating different shapes and forms of knitting. This shows a different way to construct the traditional technique of textiles which in this case is knitting.

I used a combination of hand knitting to create larges knits and a knitting machine to recreate finer knits. I also used the knitting machine to reconstruct the different shapes of the knits and knit them back together into different shapes.

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These are the forms i created by constructing my knits by creating many different shapes and contructing them together.

Postives

Can look quite aesthetically pleasing showing many different colours and different textures

Allows you to add layering on top on the knitting therefore making the knit more 3D and add texture

Negatives

Can look messy

Time consuming haveing to make separate pieces to then construct together

Material waste as having to cut off the excess material on the many different shapes used.

In conclusion even though the construction of this textile design pieces was a little different and interesting to the ‘traditional’ one shape one layered flat knit, however it is not sustainable due to it being more time consuming and creating further material waste.

Weaving with Cotton and Wool

 

Here I experimented with weaving within my first year of textile design. I used a mixture of cotton and wool within my weave that had been dyed after they had been made into the warp. I used Direct dyes onto the cotton and wool warps as they are both cellulose (natural) fibres. Cotton coming from Seeds of cotton plants. Wool fibres typically come from the animals coat eg: sheep therefore being a natural fibre but not a plant based fibre i used an acid dye.

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I found the weaving process fun even though the wool that i used was a little fragile therefore needed extra care and some more time carefully pulling it when setting up the loom. Overall I was pleased with the outcome of my weave and found that the techniques that i used contrasted and harmonized the colours well to show a aesthetically pleasing textile design piece.